Criminal Defense

Theft/Conversion

Theft

Theft in Indiana is defined as, A person who knowingly or intentionally exerts unauthorized control over property of another person, with intent to deprive the other person of any part of its value or use, commits theft, a Class A misdemeanor.

Many types of cases can be elevated to a level 6 felony under certain conditions:

1.) the value of the property is at least seven hundred fifty dollars ($750) (amounts under the same episode can be pooled together)
2.) The property is a firearm
3.) The person has a prior unrelated conviction for a theft or conversion
4.) Involves an automobile

It can be elevated to a level 5 felony if:

1.) the value of the property exceeds fifty thousand dollars ($50,000);
2.) the property that is the subject of the theft is a valuable metal
3.) relates to transportation safety or public safety;
4.) Property is taken from a hospital or other health care facility, telecommunications provider, public utility, or key facility and the    absence of the property creates a substantial risk of bodily injury to a person.

Conversion

A person who knowingly or intentionally exerts unauthorized control over property of another person commits criminal conversion, a Class A misdemeanor.

The offense is a Class D felony if committed by a person who exerts unauthorized control over the motor vehicle of another person with the intent to use the motor vehicle to assist the person in the commission of a crime.

The offense  is a Class C felony if: (1) committed by a person who exerts unauthorized control over the motor vehicle of another person; and (2) the person uses the motor vehicle to assist the person in the commission of a felony.

Note:  Prior criminal history may directly impact the level of offense that is charged in theft and conversion cases in Indiana.

Civil Liability for Conversion or Theft in Indiana

A civil action under Indiana Law may be brought against you to recover monies from an alleged theft or conversion.  Most often this involves shoplifting cases.  Large Corporations often hire law firms that specialize in civil actions to recover lost merchandise.  If you are charged with conversion (most common charge for shoplifting) you will likely receive a demand letter requesting an specific amount be paid to the avoid a civil lawsuit.  Contact an experienced criminal attorney that handles theft-conversion cases before speaking about your case to anyone demanding money.  It is important to know your rights.  Duepner Law LLC is here to help  317-450-0044 or info@duepnerlaw.com.